Race relations have tanked under Obama, poll shows

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A protester raises his arms following a clash with police in August in Ferguson, Mo. The Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by police touched off rancorous protests in Ferguson. | AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Christian Gooden

While one poll shows President Barack Obama’s job approval ratings have surged to an 18-month high, it’s not all good news.

A Gallup Poll shows Americans say race relations in the United States have gotten significantly worse from where they were before Obama took office.

When the survey was performed in Jan. 2008, 51 percent of Americans said they were satisfied with the state of race relations. Now, only 30 percent say the same, marred by the incidents in Ferguson, Missouri and New York City, where unarmed black men died at the hands of police.

Race relations accounted for the biggest drop in satisfaction among those polled, “where it has fallen among all party groups, and the U.S. system of government and how well it works, down mainly among Republicans,” according to Gallup.

Health care, acceptance of gays and lesbians and immigration are areas Americans say have improved under Obama.


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