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Trail-blazing former Sen. Carol Moseley Braun casts Illinois votes for Biden at Democratic National Convention

Moseley Braun cast 122 votes for Biden, and 59 for Sanders during the second night of the virtual Democratic convention. California Sen. Kamala Harris, the second Black woman to become a senator, is Biden’s pick for vice president.

Carol Moseley Braun represents Illinois to nominate Joe Biden during Tuesday night’s roll call vote.
Former Sen. Carol Moseley Braun represents Illinois to nominate Joe Biden during Tuesday night’s roll call vote.
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Former Sen. Carol Moseley Braun, the nation’s first Black female senator, cast Illinois’ votes for former Vice President Joe Biden during the Democratic National Convention’s roll call Tuesday night, saying the presumptive Democratic nominee has a plan to “help more people of color achieve the American dream of owning a home.”

“Discrimination has denied too many black Americans the chance to own a home and build wealth,” Moseley Braun said moments before casting the Illinois delegation’s votes.

“Joe Biden has a plan to end racist lending practices and help more people of color achieve the American dream of owning a home. This isn’t just about racial justice. It’s about strong communities, and more economic security for working families.”

Moseley Braun cast 122 votes for Biden, and 59 for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders during the second night of the virtual Democratic convention.

California Sen. Kamala Harris, the second Black woman to become a senator, is Biden’s pick for vice president.

Moseley Braun, who was elected in 1992 and served a single term, was also the first female senator elected from Illinois.

Carol Moseley Braun and Sen. Paul Simon at Moseley Braun’s campaign headquarters in 1992.
Democratic nominee Carol Moseley Braun and Sen. Paul Simon at Moseley Braun’s campaign headquarters in 1992.
Sun-Times archives.

The former senator and diplomat cast the Illinois votes during the Tuesday roll call in a pre-recorded segment at the Old State Capitol in Springfield, where then U.S. Sen. Barack Obama announced his presidential bid and later returned to announce that he picked Biden to be his running mate.

It’s also where Abraham Lincoln delivered his historic House Divided speech on June 16, 1858, after he accepted the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate.