Facebook, citing virus misinformation, deletes Trump post

The post in question featured a link to a Fox News video in which Trump says children are “virtually immune” to the virus.

SHARE Facebook, citing virus misinformation, deletes Trump post
merlin_92262909.jpg

Facebook has deleted a post by President Donald Trump for violating its policy against spreading misinformation about the coronavirus.

Getty

Facebook has deleted a post by President Donald Trump for violating its policy against spreading misinformation about the coronavirus.

The post in question featured a link to a Fox News video in which Trump says children are “virtually immune” to the virus.

Facebook said Wednesday that the “video includes false claims that a group of people is immune from COVID-19 which is a violation of our policies around harmful COVID misinformation.”

A few hours later, Twitter temporarily blocked the Trump campaign from tweeting from its account, until it removed a post with the same video. Trump’s account retweeted the video. The company said in a statement late Wednesday that the tweet violated its rules against COVID misinformation. When a tweet breaks its rules, Twitter asks users to remove the tweet in questions and bans them from posting anything else until they do.

Twitter has generally been quicker than Facebook in recent months to label posts from the president that violate its policies against misinformation and abuse.

This is not the first time that Facebook has removed a post from Trump, Facebook said, but it’s the first time it has done so because it was spreading misinformation about the coronavirus. The company has also labeled his posts.

Several studies suggest, but don’t prove, that children are less likely to become infected than adults and more likely to have only mild symptoms. But this is not the same as being “virtually immune” to the virus.

A CDC study involving 2,500 children published in April found that about 1 in 5 infected children were hospitalized versus 1 in 3 adults; three children died. The study lacks complete data on all the cases, but it also suggests that many infected children have no symptoms, which could allow them to spread the virus to others.

The Latest
All the results from the supersectionals around the state.
“Wouldn’t it be unbelievable for our city if you were to see two amazing facilities for these great sports teams built at once?” said Curt Bailey, president of Related Midwest, which oversees the vacant 62-acre site where the White Sox hope to build.
The critically acclaimed Chicago eatery helmed by Beverly Kim and Johnny Clark will be closing by the end of the month, but will re-emerge with a new concept at an undetermined future date.
Checkout lane at grocery store came to a halt as everyone waited for one customer to cover another’s shortfall.
Since returning from injury, Bedard has averaged 1.25 hits and 0.88 blocked shots per game, up from 0.64 hits and 0.33 blocked shots per game previously.