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Hardest-Working Voices in Health Care

Hardest-Working Voices in Health Care

A Sun-Times series spotlighting the people and professions that keep Chicago thriving. Health care profiles are made possible by AMITA Health.

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Providing mental health care for immigrants ‘personal for me,’ Pilsen Wellness Center director says

‘The communities we serve are very complex,’ Nestor Flores says. ‘These are vulnerable populations that are struggling to survive, low-income in many cases.’

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TapCloud app helps you tell your doctor what’s wrong

Founder Tom Riley developed the app after seeing his mom struggle to describe how she felt while battling cancer.

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Tears part of the job for organ recovery specialist, but donations ‘something beautiful’

Cara Moulesong says she gets to see the best in people who — despite going through intense trauma — are still willing to help strangers.

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Dr. Kevin Campbell: Helping people get back on their feet with post-surgery text messages

The orthopedic surgeon launched StreaMD, a Chicago tech startup, to try to help make recovery easier after an operation.

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His magic helps kids heal

‘We’re committed to empowering hospitalized kids through magic,’ says Neil Tobin of Open Heart Magic, a Chicago nonprofit that trains and sends volunteer magicians to hospitals to cheer up sick children.

Kwaku Owusu, co-founder and CEO of Drugviu.
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Kwaku Owusu: Lack of minorities in drug trials demanded attention, so he launched a company

‘It just hit me that this is a problem that I want to solve,’ the founder of Drugviu says.

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Dr. Sindhu Rajan: With 90 million at risk, preventing diabetes essential to improving global health

Her digital diabetes program is helping fight the spread of the epidemic, particularly in the Asian-Indian community.

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Dr. Andrei Pop: Saving lives ‘highly satisfying,’ but preventing problems more beneficial

The interventional cardiologist says he’s increasingly more focused on prevention programs than on performing dramatic procedures.