Goons mistook beating target for son of Melrose Park mayor, feds say

SHARE Goons mistook beating target for son of Melrose Park mayor, feds say

George Brown allegedly boasted his goon had no problem “breakin’ somebody’s legs.”

But when he and Paul Carparelli began to plot a “f—— thorough beating” for used-car dealer R. J. Serpico in Melrose Park, the feds say, Brown had a concern: He thought Serpico was the son of Melrose Park Mayor Ronald Serpico.

Brown was wrong. But he warned Carparelli the mayor might “run” to alleged mob bosses Pete and John DiFronzo, according to records filed in federal court Thursday. Or, as Brown called them, “Uncle Pete and Uncle John.”

“This has just got a special set of circumstances,” Brown allegedly said.

Federal prosecutors revealed that detail in paperwork they filed seeking a prison sentence of as high as six years for Michael “Mickey” Davis. A jury convicted Davis, 58, in June of extortion and attempted extortion. The feds accused him of ordering R.J. Serpico’s “break-both-legs beating” to collect on a $300,000 debt.

Davis is set to be sentenced Tuesday. His attorneys have asked for a sentence of as little as 13 months for a man they claim has a “genuine concern for the well-being of others, willingness to help those in need, and generous spirit.”

R.J. Serpico is the nephew of the Melrose Park mayor. The DiFronzos have business ties in Melrose Park, and a spokesman for the mayor acknowledged the mayor is aware of the brothers. But the spokesman denied there is any connection between the case, the mayor’s relative, the DiFronzos or their business endeavors.

The looming, broad-shouldered Davis approached R.J. Serpico in the office of his Melrose Park used car dealership in January 2013, months after loaning R.J. Serpico and his father $300,000 according to trial testimony.

Davis dropped a sheet of gambling debts owed by R.J. Serpico’s father down on the desk and said, “this wasn’t the f—— agreement,” Serpico testified. R.J. Serpico said Davis leaned back and asked, “how my wife and my kids were, and if I still lived in Park Ridge.” Serpico said he took it as a threat.

R.J. Serpico vomited often because of his fear of Davis, according to prosecutors. They said that fear was fueled not only by that conversation, but by Davis’ alleged association with Pete DiFronzo.

The feds say Davis arranged for Serpico’s beating by contacting Gigi Rovito, who recruited Carparelli, who sought out Brown. Carparelli allegedly told Brown the person seeking the beating was “Mickey,” adding that person was “Solly D’s” — an apparent reference to Chicago Outfit member Salvatore DeLaurentis.

Brown wound up cooperating with the feds. Carparelli pleaded guilty in May to three counts of conspiracy to commit extortion in a separate case, and he is set to be sentenced Dec. 21.

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