'All I want for Christmas is a healthy Derrick Rose' sweater on sale

SHARE 'All I want for Christmas is a healthy Derrick Rose' sweater on sale
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Many Bulls fans have just a single wish for Christmas: a healthy Derrick Rose.

Now you can wear that emotion on your sleeve, or rather your chest, with this Christmas sweater from Barstool Sports.

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Image via Twitter/@barstoolbigcat

Featured on the sweater is Rose’s toddler son, PJ.

Chicago is a completely different team when Rose, a former MVP, is at his best. Though as the injuries continue to pile up for Rose, those memories seem more and more distant.

The Bulls point guard was injured again on Monday, this time as he sprained his ankle during the fourth quarter of a 96-95 win over the Pacers.

Rose was already dealing with double vision after undergoing surgery to repair a fractured orbital last month.

The Bulls listed Rose as “doubtful” for Wednesday’s game in Phoenix.

[nicelink url=”http://chicago.suntimes.com/sports/7/71/1109419/derrick-rose-doubtful-wednesdays-game”]

Rose hasn’t played more than 51 games in any season since 2011.

WATCH: The best plays from Derrick Rose’s MVP season:

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