Obama visits Bataclan, site of French terror attack

SHARE Obama visits Bataclan, site of French terror attack
ObamaParis113015.jpg

President Barack Obama (right) and French President Francois Hollande place flowers at the Bataclan, site of one of the Paris terrorists attacks. Obama paid respects there after arriving in town for the COP21 climate change conference on Monday, Nov. 30, 2015, in Paris. | Evan Vucci/AP

PARIS — At another time, it would have been a glorious tour of Paris by night — but for the saddest of destinations.

President Barack Obama landed in Paris just before midnight Sunday, and his motorcade took on unexpected route along the Seine. He rode past the Eiffel Tower, the French Assembly building, the Bastille. Then he arrived at the Bataclan.

He walked to the shuttered French concert hall where terrorists wrought horror two weeks ago.

Obama, French President Francois Hollande and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo walked side by side to a makeshift memorial. Each added a single white rose to the collection of remembrances.

They bowed their heads for a long moment of silence, paying tribute to the 130 people who died in the worst attack on French soil in more than half a century.

Obama is in France for the climate change conference.

NANCY BENAC, Associated Press

The Latest
“The idea that we put as much energy and resource into finding a facility of our own should be an indication that we understand what direction the league is going,” Sky CEO Adam Fox said. “We want to be involved in the movement.”
For the first time since Sept. 29, 2019, the Fire will be in their traditional color when they host FC Cincinnati.
Dog toys in a drey, regular sandhill visitors in Orland Park and bowhunting harvest for turkeys in Illinois are among the notes from around Chicago outdoors and beyond.
After the Fire’s failed rebrand in 2019 that changed their primary color to blue, they’ll open their home schedule Saturday in a familiar kit.
What’s really needed is to shore up local news. Voters say they don’t have access to clear, unbiased information on candidates amid a well-documented decline of local newspapers and news media.