Naperville coach charged with sexually abusing 14-year-old girl

SHARE Naperville coach charged with sexually abusing 14-year-old girl
SHARE Naperville coach charged with sexually abusing 14-year-old girl

Bond was set at $100,000 Friday for a woman charged with inappropriately touching a 14-year-old girl she met while volunteering as a basketball coach at a middle school in west suburban Naperville.

Shakyla Wilson, 22, was a volunteer girls basketball coach at Hill Middle School in Naperville, according to a statement from the DuPage County state’s attorney’s office.

Wilson and some of the girls from the team went to see a movie together on Feb. 20, before spending the night at the home of one of the girls, according to the state’s attorney’s office. Prosecutors said Wilson had “inappropriate sexual contact” with the girl during the sleepover.

Wilson, of the 700 block of Wildflower Circle in Naperville, is charged with one count of aggravated criminal sexual abuse. If convicted, she could face up to seven years in prison.

“As a police officer and a parent, I’m deeply disturbed by the allegations in this case,” Naperville Police Chief Robert Marshall said in the statement. “Ms. Wilson purposely put herself in a position of influence and trust in order to prey on the innocence of young girls.”

Judge Brian Diamond ordered Wilson held on a $100,000 bond Friday morning. Her next court appearance is scheduled for March 24.

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