Don't worry music fans, Wrigley Field will keep hosting concerts

SHARE Don't worry music fans, Wrigley Field will keep hosting concerts
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For a little bit, it seemed like AC/DC had just rocked too hard for Wrigley Field. The legendary rock group hosted a concert earlier in the month that had Cubs players and manager Joe Maddon annoyed with field conditions.

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However, Cubs owner Tom Ricketts said Wrigley Field will definitely keep hosting concerts. Ricketts was on the Mully and Hanley Show on 670 The Score Monday morning and was asked about the topic.

The concerts are revenue, and that revenue does go back to the organization, and that money gets spent, ultimately, on players, Ricketts said. They’re good for the organization, and on top of that, they’re just magical. Concerts are Wrigley are special. The performers love it and obviously all the people love it. It’s a great way to show the park and great way to give people a good time. So we’re going to keep doing concerts, and we’ll be extra careful to make sure there’s nothing that ever affects the field of play.

Ricketts was insistent on the fact that Maddon was only joking about his complaints over field conditions. In fact, he said he joked with Maddon about taking shots at AC/DC.

I was talking to Joe this weekend, Ricketts said, and I was like, ‘Hey man, don’t be down on my favorite band from high school man. That’s not cool.’

Since making an agreement with the city in 2013, the Cubs have held four concerts in Wrigley Field during each of the last two seasons. This year, all four happened during a one month span from late August to mid-September.

A 2016 concert schedule hasn’t been released yet.

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