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Are the Bulls poised to try and protect Derrick Rose from himself?

Derrick Rose suffered a left orbital fracture after being struck in the face by an elbow on Tuesday, with the team announcing that he will undergo surgery Wednesday morning, and no timetable for a return.

The expectation was it was more of a speed bump than yet another major setback for the often-injured point guard.

As far as Rose’s fading reputation? That might take much more time to heal.

Leave it to the Rose to take what was supposed to be just another boring media day on Monday, and turning it into yet another episode of “Derrick Says the Darndest Things,’’ as the point guard was answering a question about the civil lawsuit filed against him by an ex-girlfriend, and suddenly went into an unsolicited rant about his free agency in two years.

“Making sure my family is financially stable, as far as seeing all the money that they’re passing out in this league,’’ Rose said. “Just telling the truth. Just knowing that my day will be coming up soon, and it’s not for me. It’s for [son] P.J. and his future, so that’s what I’m thinking about now.’’

Forget the fact that Rose has played in just 90 regular-season games over the last four years, and was still scheduled to make almost $42 million from the Bulls before he hits free agency after the 2016-17 season.

Rose sure seemingly did.

Not the first time that Rose has said some head-shaking things, and likely not the last. Which again leads to the question: As an organization, should the Bulls start doing more to protect Rose from himself?

“I’m not concerned about [his free agency talk],’’ first-year coach Fred Hoiberg said. “Obviously we’re preparing for the season, and Derrick is all in with this group.

“I don’t know what he said in the past to be honest with you. so yeah, again, I’m not concerned about it and I don’t think his teammates are worried about it.’’

They’re really not.

“Whatever he’s focused on let him be focused, but I think his objective is to win a championship,’’ guard Jimmy Butler said of Rose. “Everything else, he is who he is.

“He can talk about unicorns and rainbows for all I care. Just help us win some basketball games.’’

Hoiberg admitted that he is no stranger to hearing players talk about contracts in a media session, and after playing in the NBA for 10 seasons it’s almost the nature of the beast.

What he would look out for as far as Rose was concerned, however, is will Rose let the contract dictate the way he goes about his business.

“To be honest with you, when you play with guys, you play on a teams, as long as they’re going out there and doing their job there’s really not an issue,’’ Hoiberg said. “At least that’s the way I approached it on the basketball floor. If a teammate said something about their contract, you knew they were going out there and doing their work, that’s all you can ask of them.’’

As far as the Bulls front office getting involved in advising Rose of better public relations tactics, at least as far as general manager Gar Forman was concerned, what Rose does on the basketball court is what carries weight.

“Watching him work out, watching him play, and then listening to how motivated he is, I think sometimes we forget when you have to go through three or four summers of rehab,’’ Forman said. “Then he gets the opportunity to do what he loves and train all summer, it’s been a real positive.’’