No bond for man charged with fatal Bronzeville shooting

SHARE No bond for man charged with fatal Bronzeville shooting
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Marvin Lee | Chicago Police

Bond was denied on Sunday for a man charged with a fatal shooting in the Bronzeville neighborhood on the South Side this weekend.

Marvin Lee, 34, faces one felony count of first-degree murder, according to a statement from Chicago Police.

About noon Saturday, Lee opened fire during an argument with a 25-year-old man inside an apartment in the 700 block of East 47th Street, police said.

The man suffered three gunshot wounds and was taken to Stroger Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 12:43 p.m., according to police and the Cook County medical examiner’s office. His name was not immediately released pending notification of his kin.

Police said at the time that the shooter called police saying the man had broken into his home, but it was later discovered that the two knew each other and had an altercation prior to the shooting.

Lee, who lives on the same block as the shooting, appeared in bond court Sunday, where a judge ordered him held without bond, according to police and the Cook County’s sheriff’s office. He is due back in court Monday.

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