Comin’ to ya: An animated Blues Brothers TV series

SHARE Comin’ to ya: An animated Blues Brothers TV series
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Dan Aykroyd (left) and John Belushi star in “The Blues Brothers.”

They’ve got a full tank of animators, Dan Aykroyd, and they’re drawing sunglasses. Hit it!

Bento Box Entertainment, the animation company behind “Bob’s Burgers, is preparing an animated series based on the Blues Brothers, the trades reported Tuesday.

Aykroyd, who originated the role of Elwood Blues, will be an executive producer, along with Judy Belushi Pisano, the widow of John “Joliet Jake” Belushi, and Anne Beatts, who was a “Saturday Night Live” writer during the Blues Brothers’ creation.

The program is envisioned as a prime-time animated series with a musical number each week. Bento Box plans to shop the show to TV outlets.

“It’s so great to accelerate Jake and Elwood at digital speed into the 21st Century via the outstanding creative group at Bento Box,” Aykroyd said in a statement. “The show will be the Blues Brothers living in America and utilizing all new technology to make and promote their own records, seek out and record new artists and avoid law enforcement – and all while fighting for truth, justice and a better breakfast sandwich.”

The two comedians debuted the Blues Brothers on “SNL” in 1978 and recruited session greats Steve Cropper, Donald “Duck ” Dunn, Matt “Guitar” Murphy, Steve Jordan and Tom Malone for their backup band. The team recorded an album, “Briefcase Full of Blues,” drawn for a live tour, and starred in the John Landis comedy film “The Blues Brothers,” filmed in Chicago.

After Belushi’s death, Aykroyd revived the act, teamed at times with Jim Belushi and, in the film sequel “Blues Brothers 2000,” with John Goodman and Joe Morton.

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