No one hurt when minivan drives through Bloomingdale home

SHARE No one hurt when minivan drives through Bloomingdale home
SHARE No one hurt when minivan drives through Bloomingdale home

(BLOOMINGDALE) No one was hurt when a minivan drove through a home in northwest suburban Bloomingdale on Christmas Day.

About 7:20 p.m. the vehicle crashed into the front of the home in the 100 block of Norton Drive and drove through three rooms, Bloomingdale Fire Battalion Chief Chris Wilson told reporters at the scene.

The family of three who live there weren’t home at the time, Wilson said. The driver of the minivan wasn’t hurt and was being questioned by police Thursday night, officials said.

It took crews about half an hour to remove the minivan from the home, and damage to structural supports of the home displaced the family, Wilson said.

The family had hosted a Christmas Eve party for about 40 people the night before, officials said.

“In that situation you’d have the potential for severe injury or loss of life,” Wilson said.

It was the second time a vehicle crashed into a northwest suburban home in less than a month. Bloomingdale Fire Protection District crews removed a taxicab that crashed into a Glendale Heights home on Dec. 1, about a mile and a half away in the 1800 block of Gregory Avenue, officials said at the time.

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