White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson, dad reunite after father’s year in prison

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Tim Anderson looks forward to building his relationship with his father. | Jeff Roberson/Associated Press

While most players catch up on rest on their days off, White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson spent his day off Thursday catching up on old times with his father, Tim Anderson Sr., who was out of jail after being incarcerated during spring training last year.

They passed the time hanging around Tim Anderson’s house, watching TV and chatting about what each other had missed throughout the last year.

They also went to a store to buy a grill for a barbecue Sunday for Mother’s Day.

“We didn’t want to put one together, so we bought the one on display,” Tim Anderson said with a laugh.

Despite the Sox’ 11-2 loss to the Cubs on Friday, Tim Anderson’s face lit up when he talked about his father.

“He’s a good man,” he proudly said. “It’s cool. For him to come to the ballpark and see me play, it’s been a minute. But it was a great moment.”

The 24-year-old from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, gets more than just his looks from his father. He also attributes his athleticism to him. Tim Anderson Sr. played baseball growing up, but his off-the-field conduct hindered his success.

“It was a different lifestyle growing up for him because he spent most of his times in the streets,” Tim Anderson said.

Tim Anderson’s father was in jail for most of the first 15 years of his son’s life. Despite the challenges, they always have maintained a relationship. Growing up, Tim Anderson’s grandfather would routinely take him to visit his father in prison.

Now that his father is out, Tim Anderson wants to continue to build their bond.

“It’s good to have him home, and I’m excited and thankful,” Tim Anderson said. “He’s been there every step of the way. He hasn’t missed a beat. He just wasn’t there, but phone calls and long talks, he’s been my supporter from Day 1. So he gets it and understands, and it’s just great to have him back.”

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