Fans have chance to help Sister Jean, Loyola’s basketball team win global award

SHARE Fans have chance to help Sister Jean, Loyola’s basketball team win global award
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Loyola-Chicago chaplain Sister Jean Dolores Schmidt, leads the team in brayer before the first half of a regional final NCAA college basketball tournament game between Loyola-Chicago and Kansas State, Saturday, March 24, 2018, in Atlanta. | John Amis/Associated Press

After capturing the nation with its Cinderella Final Four appearance, the Loyola men’s basketball team and its chaplain, self-proclaimed “international celebrity” Sister Jean Dolores-Schmidt, are up for a global award.

The Ramblers are in the running for a Laureus World Sports Award after being nominated for May’s “Best Sporting Moment.”

Fans may vote for Sister Jean and Loyola by going to www.mylaureus.com. Voting will be open until May 21 with the winner being announced shortly after the polls close.

If the Ramblers win May’s award, they’ll go head-to-head with other winners in a final public vote for the overall award, which will be announced at the 2019 Laureus Awards Ceremony.

The nation fell in love with Sister Jean and the Ramblers during March Madness when Loyola made its first Final Four appearance since 1963 after pulling off four consecutive upsets. Freshman big man Cameron Krutwig said that he believes Sister Jean really has “connections with the big man up there.”

Maybe her connections can help Loyola rack in another award?

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