Pitchfork to feature extra services as extreme heat wave hits Chicago

The festival will provide guests with various methods of keeping cool and increased medical resources.

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Attendees of Pitchfork Music Festival, pictured in 2018, will be given special accommodations for the extreme heat hitting the city this weekend.

Attendees of Pitchfork Music Festival, pictured in 2018, will be given special accommodations for the extreme heat hitting the city this weekend.

Ashlee Rezin/Sun-Times

In preparation for the extreme heat wave expected to hit Chicago, Pitchfork Music Festival will be rolling out special accommodations for festival-goers.

The outdoor festival begins Friday, when the heat is expected to reach its peak with a high of 99 degrees.

In order to curb the heat, the festival will be providing additional measures to help patrons cool down.

The festival will provide 3 cooling buses, as well as a misting tent. There will be three free drinking fountains.

In terms of medical relief, there will be a First Aid Hydration area, which will give away free bottled water. There also will be three roaming teams of two first-aid workers to assist attendees with health or heat-related issues.

Additionally, the festival has ordered 18,000 extra bottles of water to distribute for free at the front of each stage and at the main gates.

The National Weather Service issued an Excessive Heat Watch from Thursday afternoon through Saturday evening, with the maximum heat indices peaking between the 104 to 114 degree range each afternoon.

“[Chicago Office of Emergency Management and Communications] will monitor conditions and events citywide throughout the heat period,” said Melissa Stratton, spokeswoman for the department. “As always, we will work with our public safety and health and human services departments to respond to any issues that arise to help residents seek relief from the heat.”

Pitchfork Music Festival will take place Friday to Sunday in Union Park.

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