10 years later, former Simeon star Brandon Spearman is still doing what he loves

“I’m still loving what I’m doing,” said Spearman, who is playing in Egypt. “I still want to play. I’m not giving up on this dream, not yet. I’m just going to continue doing this, and life after basketball, we will see what happens.”

SHARE 10 years later, former Simeon star Brandon Spearman is still doing what he loves
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Brandon Spearman played two seasons at Simeon.

Provided

Sharing stories of what he accomplished with Simeon 10 years ago brought joy to Brandon Spearman, who’s practicing social distancing in Egypt while his professional team’s league is on hold because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Spearman reminisced about hitting clutch shots against Benet in supersectionals and how special it was for him to cap off his final season at Simeon by winning the Class 4A state championship.

“One of the best decisions of my life was to come to Simeon,” Spearman said. “I don’t think I would’ve reached my goals and pushed myself to the way I wanted to push myself at another school. Simeon prepared me not only for life, but pretty much everything I’m succeeding at in my life and my career.”

Spearman played one season at Dayton before transferring to Hawaii, where he played two seasons. Since then, he has played in multiple European countries before landing in Egypt this season.

“I’m still loving what I’m doing,” said Spearman, 28. “I still want to play. I’m not giving up on this dream, not yet. I’m just going to continue doing this, and life after basketball, we will see what happens.”

Spearman hopes to coach or become a scout after his playing career.

“I would love to be a part of basketball when I’m done playing,” he said. “I [would like to] give back what I learned to kids one day.” 

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