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No. 1, yes, cows can be potty trained, and that’s no bull, a serious scientific study finds

Cattles’ waste can cause environmental concerns. And cows do pee a lot. A cow can produce about eight gallons of urine a day. And their potty training is faster than your kid’s.

In this photo provided by the Research Institute for Farm Animal Biology in Dummerstorf, Germany, a calf enters an astroturf-covered pen nicknamed “MooLoo” to urinate. Scientists, mimicking the process of putting a toddler on the potty until he or she has to go, put the cows in and waited until they urinated, then gave them a reward: a super-sweet liquid of mostly molasses.
In this photo provided by the Research Institute for Farm Animal Biology in Dummerstorf, Germany, a calf enters an astroturf-covered pen nicknamed “MooLoo” to urinate. Scientists, mimicking the process of putting a toddler on the potty until he or she has to go, put the cows in and waited until they urinated, then gave them a reward: a super-sweet liquid of mostly molasses.
Thomas Häntzschel / FBN via AP

Turns out cows can be potty trained as easily as toddlers. Actually, it’s even easier.

That’s no bull, according to animal behavioral scientists who put the matter to a test and found that 11 of 16 cows learned to use what the researchers dubbed their “MooLoo” when they had to go.

Just like some parents, the researchers used a sweet treat — mostly molasses — to coax the cows to push through a gate and urinate in a special pen.

It took only 15 days to train the young calves. As human parents can attest, kids take quite a bit longer.

“The cows are at least as good as children age 2 to 4 years, at least as quick,” said study senior author Lindsay Matthews, an animal behavioral scientist at New Zealand’s University of Auckland who worked with colleagues on the tests at an indoor animal research lab in Germany.

What began with a half-in-jest question on a New Zealand radio talk show about the very real problem of livestock waste resulted in a serious study published in the journal Current Biology.

And it wasn’t just a “wow, this could be fun” academic question. Massive amounts of urine waste is a serious environmental issue, Matthews said.

Urine contains nitrogen. When mixed with feces, that becomes ammonia, which is an environmental issue with acid rain and other problems, Matthews said. It also taint the water with nitrates and create the airborne pollutant nitrous oxide, he said.

And cows do pee a lot. A single cow can produce about eight gallons of urine a day, Matthews said. In 2019, nitrous oxide comprised 7% of all the U.S. greenhouse gases, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

“I am not surprised they can train calves to urinate in set locations, but I am surprised no one has demonstrated this before,” said Duke University animal cognition scientist Brian Hare, who wasn’t part of the research. “The critical question is: Can it and will it scale?”

If it could be done, toilet training animals makes it easier to manage waste products and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, said Donald Broom, a professor of animal welfare at the University of Cambridge in England.

At the lab is Dummerstorf, Germany, the researchers mimicked a toddler’s training, putting the cows in the special pen, waiting until they urinated, then giving them a reward: a sweet liquid of mostly molasses. Cows have a sweet tooth, Matthews said. If the cows urinated outside the MooLoo after the initial training, they got a squirt of cold water.

Then, in two sets of experiments, the researchers let the Holstein cows roam about the indoor facility. When they had to urinate, 11 of them pushed into the pen, did their business and got their sweet reward.

Two things to keep in mind about the experiment.

No. 1, the researchers gave diuretics to the cattle to get them to urinate more because they had limited time to run the experiments under ethics guidelines.

No. 2, they didn’t do No. 2. The scientists trained the cows to use the MooLoo only to urinate, not defecate.

Urine is a bigger problem, at least in Europe, Matthews said. But he predicted they could train cows to poop in a certain place, too.

While dogs, cats and horses can be toilet trained, they already show the desire to go in special places, but cows don’t, Matthews said.

The biggest environmental problem for livestock, though, is the heat-trapping gas methane they emit in belches and flatulence, a significant source of global warming. Sadly, cows can’t be trained not to belch or fart, Matthews said. Because if they don’t, he said, “They would blow up.”