Sophomore Antoine Glasper leads Collins into playoffs, eyes prep school move

Antoine Glasper is one of the city’s most promising young guards. He burst onto the scene as a freshman, posted big numbers in several games and attracted interest from DePaul.

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Collins’ Antoine Glasper (1) drives toward the basket against Air Force.

Collins’ Antoine Glasper (1) drives toward the basket against Air Force.

Allen Cunningham/For the Sun-Times

The Illinois High School Association’s new state tournament format has the playoffs starting on a Saturday, which is a change. The regional quarterfinal games between the lowest-seeded teams in each sectional took place all over the state.

The new format provided a weekend showcase for teams that are typically very, very far out of the spotlight.

Collins is one of those schools. The Warriors play in the White-West. They only played 16 games this season, but even that was enough for a careful observer to notice sophomore Antoine Glasper.

He’s one of the city’s most promising young guards. He burst onto the scene as a freshman, posted big numbers in several games and attracted interest from DePaul.

Glasper scored 31 in his sophomore season opener against Chicago Academy and has pretty much kept that pace up. He scored a season-high 35 against Raby and is averaging 26 points, six assists, four rebounds, and three steals for Collins.

The Warriors easily dispatched Air Force 72-30 in a Class 1A regional quarterfinal on Saturday.

Glasper scored 18. The crafty 6-1 point guard delivered no-look and behind-the-back passes early in the first quarter.

“He goes on YouTube and watches film,” said Collins coach Arristede Glasper, Antoine’s dad. “He studies the game. He told me he sees a lot on there that shows him what not to do. But he likes watching how Maurice Cheeks played. That’s the next step, to try to get him to be more vocal and that kind of leader.”

Glasper played with the loaded Meanstreets club basketball team over the summer. He was teammates with Lemont sophomore Nojus Indrusaities, one of the most highly-recruited prospects in the state. He’s planning to switch to Fred Van Vleet’s club basketball team this spring.

“I just want to make a name for myself,” Glasper said. “I’m willing to put the work in to make it happen.”

Glasper’s work ethic is strong. He arrives at Collins before school every morning and practices with his dad from 6 to 7:30 a.m. Then he heads to class and has practice with the team after school.

There’s a good chance that Glasper won’t return to Collins next season. He’s going to take a visit to Victory Rock Prep in Bradenton, Fla. this spring. Former Julian coach Loren Jackson runs the basketball program at Victory Rock.

“We want him to see other things besides for Chicago,” Arristede Glasper said. “He’s kind of hesitating but I think when we go down for the visit and he sees it he will understand. We will break it down for him and he will see that it is the right place for a gym rat.”

Before the Florida trip, there is state playoff business to attend to. Collins (6-10) will face Marshall, one of the best teams in Class 1A, in the regional semifinals on Wednesday. The Warriors will likely be overmatched by the Red-North/West team, but Glasper thinks his team has a chance.

“As long as we come out and play defense I think we can win,” Glasper said. “That’s going to be the key.”

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