Hero finally home: Army Air Corps pilot killed in WWII makes his final trip back home

The remains of Army Air Corps Lt. Roy Coulson Harms, who was killed during a bombing raid in Romania in 1943, have been returned to family in Grafton, Wis., for burial.

SHARE Hero finally home: Army Air Corps pilot killed in WWII makes his final trip back home
The remains of Army Air Corps Lt. Roy Coulson Harms, killed during a bombing raid in Romania in 1943, are carried from the military-escorted flight that brought him home after 80 years for burial in Grafton, Wis., where he was from.

The remains of Army Air Corps Lt. Roy Coulson Harms, killed during a bombing raid in Romania in 1943, are carried from the military-escorted flight that brought him home after 80 years for burial in Grafton, Wis., where he was from.

Provided

It’s over. He’s home.

The last leg of a hero’s long road home from a long-ago war has ended.

The remains of Army Air Corps pilot Roy Coulson Harms, who was killed in a 1943 World War II air raid in Europe, remained unidentified for decades — until the miracle of DNA provided the ticket back to his beloved hometown of Grafton, Wis.

On April 28, the remains of the highly decorated war hero were brought home by a military escort that turned over his body to Mueller Funeral Homes in Grafton, a town to which he bid a final farewell by circling his B-24 Liberator over it on his final flight overseas to England.

The following is a memo provided by a relative who observed Harms’ final flight home from Lincoln, Neb., to the Grafton airport.

“Last night at the airport was truly an event I will never forget.

“It was so bright behind me with all the flashing fire and law enforcement lights I could not look at it.

“My camera wouldn’t even work.

“The Army had an officer assigned to remain with Roy from Nebraska until he was relieved of his escort duties in Grafton.

“In Grafton, a group outside the funeral home was equally impressive. It was 11 o’clock p.m., and there were even high school kids with flags on their trucks that were lining the street.

“I will always remember and think of last night as Roy’s actual return home.”

Lt. Roy Coulson Harms.

Lt. Roy Coulson Harms.

Provided

Lt. Harms was being buried in the family plot, in accordance with the wishes of his parents, who died long before he was found. That also was the result of a promise made by the U.S. military to his sister Laura, 90, who died shortly after her DNA was used to finally identify his body.

“Thank God, my uncle is finally home,” said Chicago attorney William Roy Coulson, his namesake.

Royal bric-a-brac

The glitter and glamor coronation of King Charles III is offset by news that the king’s royal clothing weighs 37 pounds and that a fun box of “Coronation” breakfast flakes bearing his majesty’s face has become a mega-popular royal souvenir.

I still have my fussy Lady Sarah Ferguson, the Duchess of York, powder compact wedding souvenir, purchased when covering her wedding to Prince Andrew in 1986.

It resides near my blue Prince Charles and Camilla wedding mug, my Prince William and Kate playing cards and gold Westminster Abbey wedding cup and the King James version of the Bible printed to commemorate their wedding.

The Trump card!

He’s got bots!

Bot bling! House Speaker Kevin McCarthy has taken a card from The Donald’s playing deck.

He just texted me a “personal” invite slugged “I want to meet YOU!”

But it has a price.

“Now’s your chance,” the McCarthy missive meows, inviting me to a private dinner in Tampa. “This is an exclusive and rare opportunity….to get the inside scoop on our vision to get our country back on track.”

It also had instructions to hit an “enter to win” button for “a seat at the House Republican Spring dinner,” an invite to pay for a “plus two” dinner ticket, flight and hotel stay on a sliding scale from $35 to $5,000...and, of course, an invitation to hit the bigger-bucks “Other” button.

Once again, the siren song of bots asking patriots to pay up was singing…minus, of course, an actual date for the event.

Joe’s foe

The turn of the screw?

Robert F. Kennedy Jr., who recently tossed his activist hat into the Dem presidential ring, might be keeping something up his sleeve.

Is Kennedy, who’s a nephew of the late President John F. Kennedy, positioning himself as another Ralph Nader, the legendary irritant activist who unsuccessfully ran for president three times?

“It wasn’t about winning; it was what impact Nader had,” a top Dem politico says. “Bobby Kennedy is an anti-vaxxer progressive who has the ability to attract the disgruntled and disengaged. He is capable of causing trouble for Biden even if he doesn’t have the support of his legendary politically royal family.”

The query: Will Bobby Kennedy stir up hefty press and progressive buzz next year by showing up at the Dems’ New Hampshire primary since that state was denied premier Dem primary prominence by Biden, who tossed the prime primary time slot to South Carolina to “better reflect the nation’s diversity.”

Sneedlings

Saturday birthdays: rapper Meek Mill, 36, actor George Clooney, 62, and comedian Sasheer Zamata, 37. Sunday birthdays: singer Thelma Houston, 77, comedian Aidy Bryant, 36, actor Morocco Omari, 48, and director Amy Heckerling, 69.

The Latest
When Lori Lightfoot was mayor, her ally and campaign contributor Carmen Rossi was fined for violating city lobbying rules. Now, Brandon Johnson’s mayor, and Rossi’s in line to get more than $38 million in taxpayer-funded city deals.
Both sides in the deal have a letter of intent to finalize terms for 65 E. Huron St., property that has been in play for developers.
Drifting smoke from fires across North America are still expected to cause air pollution in Chicago, but experts say it likely to be milder than what caused last year’s thick haze and dangerous air quality.
The monumental decision sets the stage for a groundbreaking revenue-sharing model that could start steering millions of dollars directly to athletes as soon as the 2025 fall semester.