A list of every known Illinois resident charged in the U.S. Capitol breach

More than 1,300 people have been arrested in connection with the breach in almost all 50 states. That includes Illinois, where at least 49 known residents have faced federal charges for their role.

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Rioters loyal to President Donald Trump rally at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 6, 2021.

Rioters loyal to President Donald Trump rally at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 6, 2021.

Jose Luis Magana/AP file

The breach of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, interrupted a joint session of Congress that was in the midst of affirming the results of the 2020 presidential election. The attack caused an estimated $2.8 million in damage to the Capitol and triggered what has been described as likely the largest criminal investigation in U.S. history.

More than 1,300 people have been arrested in connection with the attack in almost all 50 states. That includes Illinois, where at least 49 residents have faced federal charges. They come from all around the state and include a onetime CEO, a Chicago police officer and a member of the Proud Boys.

Former President Donald Trump, the frontrunner for the 2024 Republican presidential nomination, has said he is inclined to pardon “a large portion” of those who have been charged.

Here are the Illinoisans who have faced prosecution:

Thomas B. Adams Jr. of Springfield, an associate of Roy Franklin, was found guilty after a stipulated bench trial of obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting; and disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds. He carried a “Trump” flag on the floor of the U.S. Senate during the breach. He was sentenced to 14 months in prison.

John Banuelos of Summit is charged with civil disorder; entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon; willfully and knowingly carrying a firearm on Capitol grounds; and discharging a firearm on Capitol grounds. He allegedly fired two shots from a gun into the air during the riot. His case is pending.

Joseph Bierbrodt of Sheridan is charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; physical violence in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building or grounds; parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building; physical violence in a Capitol building or grounds; assault on a federal officer; and obstruction of law enforcement during civil disorder. He is a retired member of the Illinois Army National Guard. His case is pending.

Matthew Bokoski of Chicago pleaded guilty to demonstrating in a Capitol building. The feds say he wore a “Trump 2020” flag as a cape and spent four or five minutes in the Capitol with his father. He has been sentenced to three years of probation.

Matthew Capsel of Ottawa pleaded guilty to interfering with a law enforcement officer during a civil disorder. He appeared in a TikTok video fighting with members of the National Guard outside the Capitol during the Jan. 6 riot. He has been sentenced to 18 months in prison.

Anthony Carollo of Lockport pleaded guilty along with Jeremiah Carollo of Glen Carbon and Cody Vollan of Flossmoor to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. Federal court records show investigators tracked them down after identifying their mobile devices as being present at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. He was sentenced to one year of probation.

Jeremiah Carollo of Glen Carbon pleaded guilty along with Anthony Carollo of Lockport and Cody Vollan of Flossmoor to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. Federal court records show investigators tracked them down after identifying their mobile devices as being present at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. He was sentenced to spend 21 days behind bars.

Trudy Castle of Elmhurst pleaded guilty along with Kimberly DiFrancesco to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. They were both sentenced to 30 months of probation.

Agnieszka Chwiesiuk of Chicago was charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. She is the sister of Chicago Police Officer Karol J. Chwiesiuk and was accused of spending about eight minutes inside the Capitol during the riot. A jury found her guilty of all counts. She was sentenced to three years of probation, including three months of home detention.

Karol J. Chwiesiuk, a Chicago police officer, was found guilty by a jury of entering and remaining in a restricted building; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building. He was accused of sharing pictures of himself inside U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley’s office and bragging in text messages about his role in the Capitol breach. He was sentenced to three years of probation, including three months of home detention.

Kimberly DiFrancesco of Elmhurst pleaded guilty along with Trudy Castle to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. They were both sentenced to 30 months of probation.

Brian Dula of Lockport is charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; disorderly and disruptive conduct in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; disorderly conduct in the Capitol grounds or buildings; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in the Capitol grounds or buildings. He and Kelly Lynn Fontaine allegedly spent 11 minutes inside the Capitol during the riot. Their case is pending.

James Robert “Jim Bob” Elliott of Aurora pleaded guilty to assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers. Elliott is an admitted member of the Proud Boys who shouted “Patriots, what is your occupation” before thrusting a flagpole he was carrying toward police. He was sentenced to 37 months in prison.

Leticia Vilhena Ferreira of Indian Head Park pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. The day after the Capitol breach she allegedly sent someone a text message that asked “Do you think they will go after all the people walking in the capitol area?” The person replied, “Don’t be sad. Be prepared. We are all f---ed.” She was sentenced to two weeks behind bars.

Kelly Lynn Fontaine of Lockport is charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; disorderly and disruptive conduct in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; disorderly conduct in the Capitol grounds or buildings; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in the Capitol grounds or buildings. She and Brian Dula allegedly spent 11 minutes inside the Capitol during the riot. Their case is pending.

Roy Franklin of Springfield, an associate of Thomas B. Adams Jr., was charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and obstruction of an official proceeding. Franklin is accused of making his way to the floor of the U.S. Senate during the breach. He told the Chicago Sun-Times “I got arrested for supporting Trump.” Franklin died Oct. 15, 2023, while the charges were pending, court records show.

Dawn Frankowski of Naperville pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. She was originally charged with David Wiersma, who also pleaded guilty. They were both sentenced to 18 months of probation.

Jason Gerding of Quincy pleaded guilty along with Christina Gerding to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. They wrongly entered the Capitol and posed for photographs in the Capitol Rotunda. They were each sentenced to two years of probation.

Christina Gerding of Quincy pleaded guilty along with Jason Gerding to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. They wrongly entered the Capitol and posed for photographs in the Capitol Rotunda. They were each sentenced to two years of probation.

Marcos Gleffe, formerly of Elk Grove Village, pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. Prosecutors allege Gleffe spent about 14 minutes inside the Capitol and carried a “Trump 2020 Make America Great Again” flag inside. He moved to Florida after being charged in the riot. He was sentenced to three years of probation.

Bruce Harrison of the Danville area pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. Prosecutors say he and Douglas Wangler wrongly entered the Capitol and spent about 20 minutes inside. Both were sentenced to two years of probation.

Quinn Keen of Manteno pleaded guilty to assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers. He shoved a police officer, threw a metal travel mug at others, entered the Capitol and smoked marijuana. His sentencing is set for June 27.

Christian Kulas of Kenilworth pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building. He and his brother, Mark Kulas Jr., attended then-President Donald Trump’s rally in Washington, D.C., and then wrongly entered the Capitol during the breach. A judge sentenced both to six months of probation, including two months of home detention.

Mark Kulas Jr. of Lake Forest pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. He and his brother, Christian Kulas, attended then-President Donald Trump’s rally in Washington, D.C., and then wrongly entered the Capitol during the breach. A judge sentenced both to six months of probation, including two months of home detention.

Justin LaGesse of McLeansboro is charged with destruction of government property; entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; act of physical violence in the Capitol grounds or buildings; and parading, picketing and demonstrating in a Capitol building. He and Theodore Middendorf allegedly used flagpoles to damage a window during the riot. His case is pending.

Nhi Ngoc Mai Le of Montgomery pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct in a Capitol building or grounds and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. She took video while inside the Capitol and allegedly propped her feet up on a desk in a Senate office. She was sentenced to 10 days behind bars.

William Lewis of Burbank is charged with assaulting, resisting or impeding officers, as well as civil disorder and several misdemeanors. He is accused of spraying multiple officers with wasp and hornet spray. His case is pending.

Daniel Leyden of Chicago, and his brother Joseph Leyden of La Grange, each pleaded guilty to assaulting, resisting or impeding law enforcement officers. Prosecutors said Daniel Leyden helped break through barricades near the U.S. Capitol, injuring multiple officers along the way. He was sentenced to 38 months in prison.

Joseph Leyden of La Grange, and his brother Daniel Leyden of Chicago, each pleaded guilty to assaulting, resisting or impeding law enforcement officers. Prosecutors said Joseph Leyden pushed an officer during the rioting. He was sentenced to six months in prison.

Larry Ligas of Chicago is charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. The activist who allegedly told NPR “we are patriots” amid the breach — and who appeared to have a tie to the failed 2022 gubernatorial campaign of Republican Darren Bailey — allegedly spent 8 minutes wandering around the Capitol Rotunda on Jan. 6, 2021. His case is pending.

Lance Ligocki of Oakwood is charged with civil disorder and assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers — both felonies — along with other misdemeanor charges. He is accused of swinging a “Trump” flag at police officers during the riot. His case is pending.

Christopher Logsdon of Sesser and his wife, Tina Logsdon, pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. They admitted spending about a half hour inside the Capitol and bragging about it on video. They were each sentenced to 14 days in jail.

Tina Logsdon of Sesser and her husband, Christopher Logsdon, pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. They admitted spending about a half hour inside the Capitol and bragging about it on video. They were each sentenced to 14 days in jail.

Kevin Lyons of Chicago was charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; entering and remaining in certain rooms in the Capitol building; disorderly conduct at the grounds and in a Capitol building; parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building; and obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting. Court records alleged that he wrongly entered the Capitol and took a photo of a plaque outside Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office. He was found guilty on all charges in a stipulated bench trial, and he was sentenced to 51 months in prison.

James “Mac” McNamara of Chicago pleaded guilty to assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers. He was accused of repeatedly ramming the doors of the Capitol with a metal bike rack. He was sentenced to one year in prison.

Theodore Middendorf of McLeansboro is charged with destruction of government property; entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; act of physical violence in the Capitol grounds or buildings; and parading, picketing and demonstrating in a Capitol building. He and Justin LaGesse allegedly used flagpoles to damage a window during the riot. His case is pending.

Derek Nelson of Danville pleaded guilty to entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds. He wore a colonial blue peacoat and a tricorn hat while carrying an American flag on a wooden flagpole the day of the riot. When asked near the Washington Monument why he was there, Nelson said, “to start a revolution. Why are you here?” He helped someone take a riot shield from a police officer. Then, inside the Capitol, he was nearby as rioters tried to break into the House of Representatives. When officers deployed tear gas, he donned a respirator and goggles. His sentencing is set for July 10.

Joseph Pavlik of Chicago pleaded guilty to civil disorder and entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon. The retired Chicago firefighter with apparent ties to militia groups joined rioters who spent more than two hours assaulting officers in an area known as “The Tunnel.” He was sentenced to two months in prison.

Robin Reierson of Schiller Park, a worker at the Argonne National Laboratory, has been charged with civil disorder; assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers; entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; and an act of physical violence in the Capitol grounds or buildings. Reierson was captured on video pushing officers and attempting to grab an officer’s baton near the Lower West Terrace of the Capitol. His case is pending.

Bradley Rukstales of Inverness pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing inside a Capitol building and was sentenced to 30 days in jail. He admitted that he threw a chair in the direction of officers who had previously retreated and formed a defensive line. He has completed his jail sentence.

Amy Schubert of Crest Hill pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. She and John Schubert spent more than 30 minutes in the Capitol starting at 2:22 p.m. after entering through a broken window, prosecutors said. They visited the Rotunda and a nearby hallway, and Amy Schubert entered a congressional meeting room, records show. Court records also show Amy Schubert texted someone later and said, “I’m not sure if we should have pix on fb from DC event — I don’t want to help government to be able to match up exactly how we looked/what we were wearing that day.” A judge sentenced both Schuberts to 18 months of probation.

John Schubert of Crest Hill pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. He and Amy Schubert spent more than 30 minutes in the Capitol starting at 2:22 p.m., after entering through a broken window, prosecutors said. They visited the Rotunda and a nearby hallway, and Amy Schubert entered a congressional meeting room, records show. A judge sentenced both Schuberts to 18 months of probation.

Cody Vollan of Flossmoor pleaded guilty along with Anthony Carollo of Lockport and Jeremiah Carollo of Glen Carbon to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. Federal court records show investigators tracked them down after identifying their mobile devices as being present at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. He was sentenced to one year of probation.

Nicholas Von Keudell pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct in a Capitol building and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. He is the son of Trudy Castle. He was sentenced to two years of probation.

Douglas Wangler of the Danville area pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. Prosecutors say he and Bruce Harrison wrongly entered the Capitol and spent about 20 minutes inside. Both were sentenced to two years of probation.

David Wiersma, who was arrested in Posen, pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. He was originally charged along with Dawn Frankowski and allegedly wrote on Facebook that entering the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, “was like going to the shopping mall. People talking and joking with police just coming and going.” They were both sentenced to 18 months of probation.

Shane Woods of Auburn pleaded guilty to felony charges of assaulting, resisting, or impeding law enforcement officers and a related federal assault charge. He is also accused in a Nov. 8, 2022, wrong-way crash on Interstate 55 that killed Lauren Wegner of Skokie. He was sentenced to 54 months in prison for his role in the riot at the Capitol.

Tyng Jing Yang of Hoffman Estates pleaded guilty to civil disorder. He grabbed a police baton while officers were trying to clear a crowd out of the Capitol Rotunda. He was sentenced to six days in prison.

Athanasios Zoyganeles of Chicago pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. He allegedly bragged that he “stayed on the front lines” during the breach in spite of tear gas and flash-bang grenades. He was sentenced to 10 days behind bars.

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