Late field goal extends Denver’s lead at the half

SHARE Late field goal extends Denver’s lead at the half
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Denver Broncos quarterback Brock Osweiler (17) is sacked by Chicago Bears nose tackle Bruce Gaston (76) during the first half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 22, 2015, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

While all eyes are on Brock Osweiler as he takes over for Peyton Manning, the defensive play by both teams has been the real story. At the half, the Broncos lead the Bears 10-6 in a game that has been a defensive battle.

Points came at a premium for both offenses in the first half. The Bears defense has been able to pressure Osweiler, forcing the young quarterback to check down. The Broncos scored on their first drive of the game on a long pass play to Demaryius Thomas. After that, the offense stalled for the better part of the half.

While the Bears were unable to get the ball into the end zone, they did move the ball on two drives. A pair of second quarter field goals brought the Bears to within just one point.

The Broncos were able to find a little success in the final drive of the half. Osweiler moved the team down the field and had a chance at another touchdown before half time. However, a Bears stand within the ten forced a field goal, pushing the lead to 10-6.

Denver will get the ball again to start the third quarter.

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