What channel are the Bears on?

The Bears’ return to prime time tonight against Tom Brady and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Soldier Field.

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The Bears take on Tom Brady and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers Thursday night at Soldier Field.

The Bears take on Tom Brady and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers Thursday night at Soldier Field.

Jason Behnken/AP

The Bears’ return to prime time tonight against Tom Brady and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Soldier Field. 

With the short week, the Bears had virtually no practice coming off their worst game of the season, a 19-11 loss to the Indianapolis Colts. So they’ll have to recover quickly against the 3-1 Buccaneers.

The Bears are 4-0 on short weeks under Matt Nagy (coming off Monday night or playing on Thursday night).  “It’s way more mental than physical,” Nagy said regarding the challenge of a short week. 

Brady is 9-0 with a 105.5 passer rating (19 touchdowns, five interceptions) on short-week Thursday night games in his career (excluding season openers) — all, obviously, with the Patriots. The Bucs’ defense is lagging, but it still ranks fourth in yards allowed, 10th in scoring and second in takeaways. 

Where to watch

Time: 7:20 p.m. kickoff

TV: Fox-32, NFL Network

Streaming: Amazon Prime

Radio: 780-AM, 105.9-FM

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