Bears coach Matt Nagy says vaccination status doesn’t factor into roster moves

The team is looking exclusively at ability to contribute and isn’t fazed by recent issues in Minnesota and Miami.

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Nagy is 28-20 as Bears head coach.

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Despite the recent issues with the Vikings and Dolphins in which unvaccinated players had to be quarantined as high-risk close contacts, Bears coach Matt Nagy said the organization does not factor vaccination status into any personnel moves.

“No, not at all,” he said. “For us, you’ve gotta look at who can play football and who can’t.”

The Bears have said more than 85% of their roster is vaccinated, meaning those players would be held out only if they test positive.

In Minnesota, backup quarterback Kellen Mond tested positive, triggering automatic five-day quarantine for Kirk Cousins and Nate Stanley — an avoidable scenario that infuriated coach Mike Zimmer. That left the team with one quarterback available for practice.

Similarly, when Dolphins tight ends coach and co-offensive coordinator George Godsey tested positive, the team had to remove tight ends Mike Gesicki, Cethan Carter and ex-Bear Adam Shaheen.

Nagy also said he had zero reservations about practicing with the Dolphins next week leading up to their preseason game.

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