Tiffany Haddish’s ‘They Ready’ Netflix special shows her leading by example

Despite the terrible times we are living through, the one thing guaranteed to make life better is helping someone else. And the comic is all about giving back in this special.

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After Tiffany Haddish made it, she convinced Netflix to let her present six of her favorite female standup comics in “She Ready.” Now, her second Netflix special, “They Ready,” is streaming, featuring unsung standup comics who influenced her or mentored other famous comics.

After Tiffany Haddish made it, she convinced Netflix to let her present six of her favorite female standup comics in “She Ready.” Now, her second Netflix special, “They Ready,” is streaming, featuring unsung standup comics who influenced her or mentored other famous comics.

Netflix

I’ve seen a lot of TV during the pandemic.

Let’s see. I’ve gotten my money’s worth from Netflix, thanks to series like “Bridgerton” and “Last Tango in Halifax.”

There’s a big racial upset over “Bridgerton” and “I May Destroy You,” two films dubbed “brilliant” by critics but snubbed by the Golden Globes.

I haven’t seen “I May Destroy You,” although now I might go back and take a look.

After swearing I would never, I broke down and added “The Bachelor” to my Monday night viewing.

I convinced myself I should support the first Black man to star as the bachelor even though I hate the concept of a bunch of women fighting for the same man's affections.  

It’s demeaning. But I want to see if this brother passes over the stunningly beautiful sisters to put a ring on the finger of a stunningly beautiful white woman.

I know some of you think that my desire to see a Black woman get ahead of the pack is racist, so I apologize to anyone I’ve offended.

But it would be great to see a sister get some love from “The Bachelor,” even if it is fake.

Although advertisers are making commercials depicting interracial couples (apparently trying to convince us that we live in a “mix-ish” society), there are still too many attractive and accomplished Black women without partners.

Matt, the Black bachelor, needs to own his blackness like Tiffany Haddish owns hers and share this moment with a Black woman.

Haddish, the breakout star of the hilarious “Girl Trip,” used her breakthrough to shine a spotlight on other Black comedians who weren’t as lucky.

After Haddish made it, she persuaded Netflix execs to let her present six of her favorite female standup comics in “She Ready.”

It was a hoot and a hit.

Her second Netflix special, “They Ready,” has now been released and features seasoned but unsung standup comics who influenced her or mentored other famous comics.

For instance: Tony Woods. I hadn’t heard of him, but Woods mentored Dave Chappelle, and we all know who he is.

The other comedians — Dean Edwards, Kimberly Clark, Barbara Carlyle, Erin Jackson and Godfrey — were funny.

The show saluted Black History Month without being a Black History Month program.

Hosting the special, Haddish wore a skintight, red leather pantsuit similar to that worn by Eddie Murphy in his 1984 HBO special.

She joked that she wanted to be featured in a “who wore it best” meme.

For the most part, the Haddish-sponsored comics were hilarious people who could make you laugh without a lot of cursing and vulgarity.

The African American proverb “each one teach one” was on full display during the bonus discussion after the show when Haddish let the comedians talk about what it takes to do standup.

I needed the laughs.

More than that, I needed Haddish’s Sankofa gesture.

Sankofa is an African word that says: “It is not taboo to fetch what is at risk of being left behind.” “They Ready” was a love letter — and a reminder — that, despite the terrible times we are living through, the one thing guaranteed to make life better is helping someone else.

The comedians Haddish featured seemed to be genuinely grateful that they weren’t forgotten. Whatever kindness they showed Haddish as she labored to hone her craft and survive in an environment that is not always welcoming to women, it’s clear that Haddish truly is appreciative.

If I compare Haddish’s gesture to the kissing and crying that goes on during an episode of “The Bachelor” just because someone got a rose, I could feel really guilty about the waste of time.

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