Second Chicago cop pleads guilty in crash report bribery scheme

Kevin Tate admitted taking “not less than $10,000” from Richard Burton, who ran National Attorney Referral Service.

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A second Chicago Police officer has admitted taking thousands of dollars in bribes in exchange for early access to the names of traffic crash victims.

Kevin Tate pleaded guilty Friday before U.S. District Judge Charles Norgle. Tate admitted taking “not less than $10,000” from Richard Burton, who ran National Attorney Referral Service.

Tate, 48, also admitted he would send as many as 100 crash reports to Burton every month, giving Burton access to the names and contact information of potential clients. Tate’s sentencing has been set for Jan. 8.

Burton pleaded guilty in June, records show, though his sentencing hearing has not been set. Another officer caught up in the scheme but charged separately, Milot Cadichon, pleaded guilty last month and faces sentencing Nov. 25.

All three men face up to five years in prison.

When the officers were charged in September 2018, CPD spokesman Anthony Guglielmi announced that CPD Supt. Eddie Johnson had stripped them of their police powers.

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