Police seek car that damaged memorial in Hobart park

The car knocked down multiple light posts, including one that served as a memorial for a deceased person and another that commemorated a civic organization.

SHARE Police seek car that damaged memorial in Hobart park
Police are looking for a car that drove through Festival Park and damaged a memorial Feb. 29, 2020, in Hobart, Indiana.

Police are looking for a car that drove through Festival Park and damaged a memorial Feb. 29, 2020, in Hobart, Indiana.

Hobart police

Authorities are looking for a car that drove through a park last week in northwest Indiana, knocking down poles and damaging a memorial.

The car, thought to be a Ford Taurus from 2001-2003, was recorded on surveillance video about 1:40 a.m. Feb. 29 driving on sidewalks in Festival Park, 11 E. Old Ridge Road in Hobart, Indiana, according to a statement from Hobart police.

The car knocked down multiple light posts, including one that served as a memorial for a deceased person and another that commemorated a civic organization, police said. It caused “several thousand dollars worth of damage.”

Investigators found debris at the scene that may have come from the car’s driver’s-side taillight cover, police said. The car appeared to be gray or black in the videos, but the lighting made its exact color unclear.

Police released surveillance images of the car and are asking anyone with information to call Detective Zachary Crawford at 219-942-4774.

Read more on crime, and track the city’s homicides.

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