River North bank employee stabbed, critically hurt after ‘brief conversation’ with attacker; detectives questioning person of interest

The 24-year-old woman was attacked Wednesday morning at a Chase Bank branch on Dearborn Street.

SHARE River North bank employee stabbed, critically hurt after ‘brief conversation’ with attacker; detectives questioning person of interest
A Chase Bank branch in the 600 block of North Dearborn Street.

A Chase Bank branch in the 600 block of North Dearborn Street, where a woman was stabbed Wednesday.

Google Street View

A person was being questioned by detectives after a bank employee was critically wounded in a stabbing in the lobby of a River North bank branch Wednesday morning.

The 24-year-old woman was stabbed on the side of her neck after “after having a brief conversation” with a man inside the bank, Chicago police said.

Paramedics were called around 11:10 a.m. to the lobby of the Chase Bank branch at 600 N. Dearborn St., a Chicago Fire Department spokesman said.

She was taken to Northwestern Memorial Hospital in critical condition, police said.

A Chase Bank spokesman confirmed the victim was an employee. “Our thoughts right now are with our employee and their family,” spokesman Brian Hanover said in an emailed statement.

Chase Bank closed the rest of their downtown branches Wednesday as a precaution, the spokesman said.

Police confirmed that they were speaking to a person of interest in connection with the attack.

The Latest
The delightful variety of summer fishing around Chicago goes on, with the added accent of pink salmon, to lead this sprawling raw-file Midwest Fishing Report.
Richardson declined to discuss the current status of negotiations with Russia over Griner and Paul Whelan or to explain what role he may be playing in the talks.
His down-to-earth clothing was meant to celebrate the human body regardless of race, build, size or age.
Anthony M. Strozier, 31, was caught on surveillance video using bolt cutters to snip the lock of an antique glass case and making off with four watches, court records show.
The Big Ten was looking for a seven-year deal worth $380 million per year from ESPN, and the network declined.