Lollapalooza requiring masks for all indoor spaces Saturday and Sunday

On Friday, festival organizers issued a mask mandate for all indoor spaces.

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Starting Saturday, you’ll need a mask to enter the merchandise shop at Lollapalooza in Grant Park.

Starting Saturday, you’ll need a mask to enter the merchandise shop at Lollapalooza in Grant Park.

Matt Moore/Sun-Times

With Day 2 of Lollapalooza almost over, festival organizers on Friday had some big news regarding COVID safety protocols: starting Saturday, masks will be required at all indoor spaces on the festival grounds.

The areas include the box office, merchandise shop, two hospitality lounges and wristband help tents.

The announcement was made via Lolla social media accounts and app, encouraging festival-goers to bring along a mask for Saturday and Sunday.

The mandate is the latest in the COVID safety protocols listed on the festival’s website, most prominent: all festival-goers must present proof of vaccination or a negative COVID.

On Friday, festival-goers were greeted by posted signs advising them that attendees assume all risk related to exposure to the virus.

Signs posted at an entrance to Lollapalooza alert attendees that they voluntarily assume all risks related to COVID exposure. Ashlee Rezin/Sun-Times

Signs posted at an entrance to Lollapalooza alert attendees that they voluntarily assume all risks related to COVID exposure.

Ashlee Rezin/Sun-Times

The Sun-Times on Tuesday reported that the festival is also asking people to comply with the Lollapalooza Fan Health Pledge, which asks patrons to not attend the festival if they have tested positive or been exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 within 14 days; if they’ve had a fever or any symptoms of COVID-19 within 48 hours of attending the festival; or if they have traveled to any foreign countries subject to travel or quarantine advisories due to COVID-19.

Contributing: Mary Chappell

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