Showtime’s ‘Belushi’ documentary to open Chicago International Film Festival

Biography of the late Chicago comedian will screen at Pilsen drive-in as well as online.

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Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi star in the John Landis comedy “The Blues Brothers.”

Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi star in the John Landis comedy “The Blues Brothers.”

Universal

A documentary about the late Chicago comedian/actor John Belushi will open the 56th Chicago International Film Festival in October.

Showtime Documentary Films’ “Belushi,” from filmmaker R.J. Cutler (“The War Room”), depicts Belushi’s life and times — from his early years in Wheaton and his work at Second City to “Saturday Night Live” and feature films including “Animal House” and “The Blues Brothers,” to his untimely death from a drug overdose at age 33. The story unfolds amid unheard audiotapes as well as interviews with his family members, close friends and collaborators.

The festival will screen the film at 7 p.m. Oct. 14 at ChiTown Movies drive-in theater in Pilsen (2343 S. Throop) and present it online until the fest ends Oct. 25. It will make its Showtime debut at 8 p.m. Nov. 22.

The closing night film on Oct. 24, also at the drive-in, will be “Nomadland,” starring Frances McDormand.

An Oct. 17 ChiTown Movies screening of Kate Winslet’s new film, “Ammonite,” will include the presentation of a career achievement award to the Oscar-winning actress. And a conversation with Rachel Brosnahan of “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” will accompany the Oct. 21 virtual screening of her new film, “I’m Your Woman.”

Tickets go on sale Sept. 28 at chicagofilmfestival.com.

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