Stephanie Izard knows how to push her buttons

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Girl & The Goat, Stephanie Izard’s long-awaited West Loop restaurant, will finally open in June.

But if you just can’t wait ’til then — or you’re not a fan of crowds — you now have a chance to get a sneak peek at the goods a little earlier than everyone else. Izard and her cronies have begun distributing 1,000 “goat buttons” within the next week or so, each of which will have a unique number. She’ll then draw 25 numbers and post them on her website on Monday, May 24. Each winner will get to bring a guest to one of the “friends and family” preview dinners at the restaurant.

Want a button? Stephanie will be handing them out at the Green City Market on Saturday at 11:30 a.m. and at the 61st Market on May 22 at 11:30 a.m. You can also snag one by buying a local beer at Rootstock or one of several items (Midwest pork products, local asparagus, Milk & Honey granola, Sunshine Farms goat milk, Prairie Fruits Farm cheese, Carr Valley Applewood smoked cheddar, Half Acre beer or Three Floyds beer) at Whole Foods May 15-22. Steve Dolinsky is also giving away two tickets on his blog, too.

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