William Shatner knows the ups, downs of traveling

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LOS ANGELES — William Shatner is back as a shrewd, unflappable travel expert in his latest TV commercial for an online company.

But in real life, even Shatner can’t avoid the perils of getting through airport security lines.

“I got patted down one time, wearing loose-fitting clothing, and my pants fell down. It was one of the most embarrassing moments of my life,” Shatner said, recalling the incident at Los Angeles International Airport.

Shatner returns as the priceline.com Negotiator in a new ad campaign that launches Sunday, with Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting (“The Big Bang Theory”) again playing the travel pro’s daughter. He’s unfazed that fans recognize him for the long-running commercial gig as well as the “Star Trek” TV series and movies and his Golden Globe-winning role on “Boston Legal.”

“This is a form of creativity,” he said of collaborating on the TV spots. “It is like an acting job.”

Working with priceline.com is only part of what keeps Shatner busy as he nears his 84th birthday in March.

The original Capt. James T. Kirk just wrapped a national tour of his one-man stage show and is planning for another. He’s got what he calls an “unusual” summer series for NBC in the works; is in the upcoming fact-based movie “The Sunday Horse”; and is collaborating with a custom motorcycle manufacturer on designing a new three-wheeled vehicle.

Shatner, an avid motorcyclist, plans a Chicago-to-Los Angeles charity ride to launch the bike this summer. Another longtime passion is horses, which he rides competitively and which help him keep fit.

“I get out and ride five, six horses in a session, and might spend three hours riding very hard,” he said. “I feel great. I don’t even think of age.”

BY LYNN ELBER, AP Television Writer

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