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Business news, from Chicago’s largest corporations to local small businesses, including consumer watchdog reports and updates from industries like technology and retail.

The document charging Lavdim “Deme” Memisovski was signed by Assistant U.S. Attorney Amarjeet S. Bhachu, who is prosecuting cases against former House Speaker Michael J. Madigan and Ald. Edward M. Burke.
The strike also is delaying road resurfacing around Chicago and projects including the Interstate 55 and Weber Road interchange and the Interstate 80 bridge in Joliet.
Magic and other circus acts will accompany scoops of gelato at Sideshow Gelato, coming to Lincoln Square next year.
“You don’t need the ordinance, you need common sense,” Dr. Demetra Soter said. “This management company knew what to do and didn’t do it.”
At least nine people died nationwide and an estimated 11,500 were injured last year in accidents involving fireworks, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.
How much insurance companies collected — and how much more they could have given back to drivers.
The long-vacant, two-story former Lake Meadows professional building at 31st Street and Rhodes Avenue — a dormant but architecturally significant modernist South Side office building — is getting a major fix-up.
The winner of the Chicago casino bid, who promised good labor relations here, nearly had to contend with a walkout over the July 4 weekend at its operation outside Providence.
In light of employers moving in and out of Chicago, Harry Kraemer Jr. weighs in on what’s important to corporate leaders and how the city’s boosters can appeal to them.
The privately operated, publicly funded school has used cash advances and “predatory loans” for funding, city school officials say. Urban Prep leaders say its financial issues are resolved.
Federal standards are needed to regulate driver-assisted technology, says Steven Cliff, the new head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
Witnesses sharply criticized the fast-growing health plans, citing audits and other reports that described plans denying access to health care.
Though economists worry that higher interest rates could push the nation into a recession, the Fed chair pointed to a strong labor market and said most households and businesses have healthy savings.
It’s unclear if Griffin will continue his heavy spending in Illinois politics after he and his Citadel hedge fund have packed up and left for Miami. But what was obvious was that his latest big bet on elections in this state was a big failure, up and down the ballot.
“I worked 30 years of my life in management, so I was an ideal employee, I had ambitions to move up with Zen Leaf,” said Jim Doane, an organizing employee. “But I’m an old guy and I am tired of being bullied by the bosses. I showed up early, I received praise and I worked hard for them to just fire me.”
The search engine company says it is growing in Chicago, but it won’t speak directly to a report of its interest in the former state government hub in the Loop.
The arrangement, in an acknowledgement of continued hybrid work, marks a downsizing from the paper’s home on the Near West Side.
A letter from World Business Chicago, signed by Mayor Lori Lightfoot and other civic leaders, urges Fortune 500 companies to invest here because local laws respect worker diversity and impose fewer limits on abortions.
Ken Griffin’s exit from Chicago had to do with crime, but many more factors are at play in the spate of corporate decisions about where to set up shop.
The organization, which includes 300 labor unions across the city, says many union workers have become part of crime statistics.
The Cook County Land Bank Authority is barred from putting in a claim on occupied property, but it did so for Josephine’s Cooking and held onto it as the restaurant kept operating and its unpaid taxes kept piling up.
The announcement came rather awkwardly just five days ahead of the June 28 primary — a primary in which Griffin has contributed $53 million to the campaign of Aurora Mayor Richard Irvin, who is dropping in the polls.
“Many of the major funders ... are checking out. And they’re in Florida. When they leave, their charitable dollars leave,” said a source close to the world of philanthropic and charitable giving in Chicago and Illinois.
“If you would rather pay for an empty store and an abandoned store for the next five years than invest in our community, you don’t deserve to be here,” Ald. Stephanie Coleman said. “And quite frankly, we don’t want you here.”
Making good on threats, the richest man in Illinois said he is taking his companies to Miami.