Walk raises prostate cancer awareness

SHARE Walk raises prostate cancer awareness

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month.

In the United States, more than 230,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year. Some 30,000 men die from the disease each year. My dad was one of them.

So I like events that raise money for a cure as well as offer education on prostate cancer. The 11th Annual SEA Blue Chicago Prostate Cancer Walk & Run certainly fits the bill.

Sponsored by Us Too, it will be held on Sunday (Sept. 13) in Lincoln Park (near the intersection of LaSalle and Stockton Drive). There’s a whole lot of activities included.

There will be a CARA-certified 5k run as well as a 1k celebration walk (complete with a sea of blue confetti).

As I said, education is a part of this event, too. There will be doctor-lead discussions on topics of particular interest to those with prostate cancer. Check them out here. Also, men can get free PSA tests that day.

Free lunch, snacks, drinks and T-shirts will be provided to participants. There will be a DJ as well as live entertainment, including the Jesse White Tumblers. Steve Sanders, WGN anchor and prostate cancer survivor, will be the day’s emcee.

Knowing that the walk often brings out entire families, there will be a Family Fun Zone with the always-popular bouncy house, face-painting, balloons and a lot more.

To register, go here. Also, as the photo below shows, the walk goes on, rain or shine!

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PHOTOS: Courtesy SEA Blue Chicago Prostate Cancer Walk & Run

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