Male shot by police in Austin

Chicago Police shot someone who they say pointed a gun at officers Monday night in the Austin neighborhood on the West Side.

Area North Gang Enforcement officers were on a gang suppression mission in the 1000 block of North Laramie about 9:40 p.m. when they saw the male approaching their vehicle on foot, according to a statement from Chicago Police.

When the officers exited the vehicle to conduct a field interview, the male ran away and the officers chased him, police said. He ran into a gangway, where he tripped and fell and a gun fell from his waistband.

He picked up the gun and pointed it at officers, at which point an officer shot him, police said.

He then ran south to the 900 block of South Laramie, where he entered a house through an open window, Chicago Police Deputy Chief Dana Alexander told a reporter at the scene.

Multiple children and adults were inside the house, and the occupants told officers they thought someone had entered the home, Alexander said. Officers found the suspect hiding under a bed. A weapon was also recovered inside the home.

The suspect was taken to a hospital with a gunshot wound to his bicep, Alexander said.

The Independent Police Review Authority is investigating the incident.

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