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Friday letters: Quarterback Tom Brady finally gets a fair break

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady

I support New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady’s four-game suspension being nullified by the courts. A person is innocent until proven guilty. All evidence against Brady was at best circumstantial. In the NFL, all teams play with footballs that they alone maintain. They keep them warm in cold weather and legally rough them up to their QB’s specs. Not to mention the transferred “stickum” receivers put on their gloves for catching the footballs. Fuzzy rules yah think?

Bob Anichini, Edgebrook

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Back to school advice from the pros

As you deliver your children head off to school, you may be anxious about the new school year. So, too, are the teachers — excited to see the new faces in classrooms — and the support professionals — excited to greet their bus riders or serve lunches.

Parents and educators all feel some trepidation as well as excitement with the start of the new school year.

Educators want the very best for students and families. Every day, pre-school, elementary and high school teachers and support staff, all members of the Illinois Education Association, arrive to school early, ready to give their very best to their students.

Sending an apple to the teacher is nice but instead, the support you can provide to your children and grandchildren will help them make the year great. A few suggestions:

  • Learn the names of your child’s teachers – the grade level teacher in elementary school, and subject level teachers in middle and high school. Also know the names of all of your child’s teachers – art, music, P.E., reading, etc., along with the names of teachers’ aides and support staff your child sees every day.
  • Find out what units/material/topics will be covered during the year. This is often found in a course syllabus handed out by the teacher, or you can look through your child’s textbooks. You also can visit the library and get a book about the subject being studied.
  • Use the time in a car to talk and do activities that reinforce the skills learned in school. Have your younger child count cars or add numbers. Strike up a conversation – don’t just ask, “How was your day?” Or “What did you learn today?” Often, answers are short and uninformative. Instead, ask things like, “What was the funniest (nicest, silliest) thing that happened today?”
  • Insist that your children do their homework in a quiet area, organize their materials for the next day, and get a good night’s sleep.
  • Finally, touch base with the teacher(s) whenever you have a concern or question, or need some insight on how your child is doing.

The educators who spend a lot of time with your children every day want the best year possible. With all the adults in the school and at home working together, students will feel supported, and that can only lead to success.

Cinda Klickna, President, Illinois Education Association

Iran deal beats 13 years of war

After more than 13 years at war, I’m glad that Congress is turning toward diplomacy and peace. The Iran deal looks like it will move forward through Congress, and I support the 34+ senators who have spoken out in favor of the deal.

The Iran deal dramatically shrinks Iran’s nuclear program, gives international inspectors unprecedented access, and could open diplomatic channels for the U.S. and others to finally end enduring conflicts in the region.

Now is the time for peace. Now is the time for diplomacy. Now is the time for Congress to support the Iran deal.

Rupa Shah, Forest Park