Dems, GOP voters divided on FBI email news: CBS survey

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is shown with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis. Their final debate is Wednesday at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. | AFP photo

WASHINGTON – A CBS News battleground states poll taken on Friday and Saturday – after the news broke of the FBI decision to look again at Hillary Clinton emails – found partisans divided.

The internet survey of voters in the battlegrounds ofArizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Michigan, North Carolina, New Hampshire, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wisconsin found:

* Bottom line: “Among voters overall, 71 percent say it will not change their thinking, or that they have already voted.”

*”Republicans call it bad and expect the emails to contain things damaging to Hillary Clinton.”

*”Most Democrats say too much is being made of it. While a sizeable third of Democrats do call it bad, those same Democrats also feel the email matter is not as bad as things they dislike about Donald Trump, and so they are not re-evaluating their vote.”

METHODOLOGY: “This CBS News 2016 Battleground Tracker is a panel study based on 4,074 interviews conducted on the internet of registered voters in Arizona, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Colorado on October 26-28, 2016 and 4,500 interviews in thirteen battleground states (Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Michigan, North Carolina, New Hampshire, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wisconsin) on October 28-29, 2016 for a brief recontact survey regarding the FBI statement. The margin of error for the full battleground survey is +/- 1.9%; for Arizona ±4.3% for North Carolina ±4.1%, for Colorado ±4.1%, for Pennsylvania ±3.7%”

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