Men arrested after 2 guns found during West Side traffic stop

SHARE Men arrested after 2 guns found during West Side traffic stop
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Carlton Harris (left) and Trevor Brantley | Cook County sheriff’s office

Two men were arrested Saturday night after two loaded guns were found during a traffic stop in the East Garfield Park neighborhood on the West Side.

Trevor Brantley, 25, has been charged with unlawful use of a weapon, while 24-year-old Carlton Harris, who was on parole at the time of the traffic stop, faces a charge of unlawful use of a weapon by a felon, according to a statement from the Cook County sheriff’s office.

About 11:30 p.m., a sheriff’s police patrol “conducting street crime suppression,” stopped a black Chevrolet TrailBlazer with an expired registration near West Jackson Boulevard and South Central Park Avenue, the statement said.

During the stop, the handle of a handgun could be seen protruding from the driver’s right coat pocket as he reached for his wallet, police said. An initial pat down led to the recovery of a loaded .40 caliber handgun. The officers also searched the vehicle and found a loaded .25 caliber handgun in a pouch behind the front seat.

The driver, identified as Brantley, has been ordered held at Cook County Jail on a $10,000 bond, the sheriff’s office said. Harris, who was a passenger in the vehicle, was ordered held on a $70,000 bond. They are both due back in court on March 10.

Harris was released on parole in July 2016 for convictions in Cook County for possession of a controlled substance, according to the Illinois Department of Corrections.

Two guns were recovered and two men were arrested Saturday night after a traffic stop in East Garfield Park. | Cook County sheriff’s office

Two guns were recovered and two men were arrested Saturday night after a traffic stop in East Garfield Park. | Cook County sheriff’s office

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