NRA files lawsuit over Florida gun control law

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Flanked by Florida legislators and family members of victims of the Marjory Stonemason Douglas school shooting, Florida Gov. Rick Scott is applauded before he signs the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Public Safety Act in the Governor’s office at the Florida Capital in Tallahassee, Fla., Friday March 9, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — The National Rifle Association has filed a federal lawsuit over gun control legislation Florida Gov. Rick Scott has signed, saying it violates the Second Amendment by raising the age to buy guns from 18 to 21.

The lawsuit came just hours after Gov. Scott, a Republican, signed the compromise bill Friday afternoon.

Lawyers for the NRA want a federal judge to block the new age restriction from taking effect.

The new legislation raises the minimum age to buy rifles from 18 to 21, extends a three-day waiting period for handgun purchases to include long guns and bans bump stocks that allow guns to mimic fully automatic fire. It also creates a so-called “guardian” program that enables teachers and other school employees to carry handguns.

The new measures come in the wake of the Feb. 14 shooting rampage at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, that killed 17 people.

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