R. Kelly says media using sex allegations to kill his legacy

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In this June 30, 2013, file photo, R. Kelly performs onstage at the BET Awards at the Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles. The Sun-Times first wrote in 2000 about his pattern of pursuing teenage girls. | Frank Micelotta/Invision/AP, File

NEW YORK — R. Kelly says the media are attempting to distort and destroy his legacy by reporting allegations that he sexually mistreats women.

The R&B artist says in a statement Friday that he’s “heartbroken” by the accusations.

Calling himself “a God-fearing man, a son, a brother, and most importantly a father,” Kelly says the media “has dissected and manipulated these false allegations.”

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Kelly was acquitted of child pornography charges in Chicago in 2008, but speculation about his alleged sexual misconduct has continued. Last month, the #MuteRKelly campaign was launched.

He says he is currently not the subject of any criminal investigations.

Kelly says the accusations “perpetuated by the media” are an “attempt to distort my character and to destroy my legacy that I have worked so hard to build.”

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