Wishbone has found a new West Loop home

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Wishbone, which was at their West Loop location, 1001 W. Washington Blvd. for the past 26 years, is moving to a space at 161 N. Jefferson St. that was formerly occupied by Bin 36. | Wishbone

West Loop restaurant Wishbone has found a new home.

Wishbone, which has been at 1001 W. Washington Blvd. for 26 years, is moving to a space at 161 N. Jefferson St. that was formerly occupied by Bin 36.

Joel Nickson, one of Wishbone’s co-owners, told the Chicago Sun-Times that the transition to the new address will be tough since they been at their current location for so long.

“I’m not looking forward to the move. I’m glad it worked that we’re still kind of in the neighborhood. Maybe the parking is better?” Nickson said. “It’s hard because we’ve been here for so long in this neighborhood. We’re happy that we can keep our staff. A lot of our customers are supportive of the move.”

In April, Nickson told the Chicago Reader that Wishbone was moving to a spot that would be “1/2 a mile east …” of their current location.

Wishbone sells Southern delights such as blackened catfish, po’boys and jambalaya omelettes.

The Lakeview restaurant at 3300 N. Lincoln Avenue is run by Nickson’s brother, Guy.

The new location was first reported by Eater Chicago.


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