Adam L. Jahns: Analyzing the Bears’ offseason gains, training-camp expectations

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Bears coach Matt Nagy watches rookie minicamp. | Nam Y. Huh/AP Photo

The Bears have started their summer vacation. Sun-Times expert Adam L. Jahns breaks down what he learned during the offseason program and what he expects to see at training camp in July:

Matt Nagy has …

Reinvigorated Halas Hall. With all due respect to John Fox, change has been good. Nagy’s messages have resonated on both sides of the ball. It was particularly encouraging to hear defensive players repeat them. It helped that coordinator Vic Fangio and his entire staff returned for the defense, but players also expressed excitement about Nagy’s scheme and aggressive offensive approach. They finally get to watch a modern offense from the sideline.

Mitch Trubisky will …

Thrive at some point in Nagy’s offense. He fits it, and it fits him. But fans heading to Bourbonnais for training camp should be prepared to see muffed plays, errant throws and mistakes from Trubisky. Nagy tested him during the offseason program, and that will continue in camp. Nagy’s offense is complex and puts a lot on quarterbacks. Time and patience are required. Nagy, though, did express satisfaction with Trubisky’s development during the offseason program.

Keep an eye on …

Receiver Kevin White. He looks faster and more explosive than he did at this point last year, when he was returning from his second surgery on his lower left leg. Receiver Allen Robinson was limited throughout the offseason program, and White took advantage. Trubisky, in particular, sounded encouraged by White’s performances. Will that continue in Bourbonnais? All eyes should be on White. This could be his last season with the Bears.

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Be excited about …

Tight end Trey Burton. He always seemed open during the offseason program, and he and Trubisky clearly are developing a rapport. Just ask Trubisky. ‘‘Me and him have really clicked throughout the [organized team activities],’’ Trubisky said. ‘‘This is going to be a great combination for us.’’

Be concerned about …

The Bears’ outside linebackers, and look no further than the situations of Aaron Lynch and Leonard Floyd. Lynch suffered ankle and hamstring injuries during the offseason program. For a player with pre-existing question marks, they were red flags. Are the Bears counting too much on him? Floyd, meanwhile, is wearing a bulky brace on his right knee that he described as ‘‘kind of restrictive.’’ He indicated the training staff will look at changing the brace, but he needed it after suffering sprained ligaments in Week 13.

Consider me …

Still cautiously optimistic. The Bears are more talented overall. Nagy’s offense also works better for Trubisky than what Fox wanted to run last season. Fangio’s defense should be potent again. But all of it seems to be too good to be true at this point. Everyone is optimistic in June. Let’s not get carried away with it. Nagy will be the first to tell you more work is needed. A turnaround seems to be coming, but is it one year away?

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