A black cop’s frank look at tensions between police, communities of color

SHARE A black cop’s frank look at tensions between police, communities of color
1d8bff96_29ce_493e_994c_17b443bee5df_author_photo_matt_horace.jpg

Matthew Horace was a police officer and supervisor for 28 years. | Provided photo

In “The Black and the Blue: A Cop Reveals the Crimes, Racism and Injustice in America’s Law Enforcement” (Hachette, $17.99), Matthew Horacepresents an often-wrenching take on the tensions between police andcommunities of color from his vantage as a cop for 28 years who patrolled the streets and supervised officers from New Jerseyto Colorado.

There is frank discussion about bigoted cops, outdated proceduresand fledgling signs of reform. Horace, who’s African-American, also offers black officers who speak of the tightrope they walk between black citizens whose experiences with the law have left them wearyand colleagues resistant to change.

Horace, who wrote the book withformer Los Angeles Times reporterRon Harris, understands how the decisions that officers make can go awry in a split second.

But he also knows what it’s like to be racially profiled. Eight years into his career, he found himself splayed on the ground as a white cop pointed a gun at his head.

“The Black and the Blue” is anaffirmation of the critical need for criminal justice reform, all the more urgent because it comes from an insider who respects his profession but acknowledges its flaws.

The Latest
Robert Feder, trusted chronicler of Chicago media, calls it a day.
Stewart is a Chicago native and a 2021 MacArthur Foundation Fellow known for her contributions to film studies and advocacy for film preservation.
The No. 3-seeded Jabeur, a 27-year-old from Tunisia, got past her good friend Tatjana Maria 6-2, 3-6, 6-1 in an up-and-down semifinal at a sun-splashed Centre Court on Thursday.
Moore, who signed a one-year contract after a mini-camp tryout in April, is the third Bears player arrested since Ryan Poles was hired as general manager in January.
The stakes were raised in June as college coaches evaluated the top prospects in Illinois while playing with their high school teams.