Cheers! Illinois has the cheapest beer in the country

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Simply.Thirfty.Thrive calculated the average cost of a case of beer in every state, and Illinois was the cheapest. | AP photo

If you’ve seriously considered moving after this year’s polar vortex, here’s a good reason to stay.

Illinois is the cheapest state in the country to buy a case of beer.

That’s according to Simply.Thirfty.Thrive, a personal finance blog that calculated the average cost of a 24-pack of Bud Light and Miller Lite in every state, and then averaged the cost of those two beers together. Those brands, and quantity, were chosen because of their national popularity, according to the February blog post.

In the Land of Lincoln, you can get a case of beer for an average of $15.20, and that’s as cheap as it gets. South Carolina, New York, Rhode Island, Kansas and Michigan rounded out the top five states with the cheapest beer, with 24 packs for under $17 on average.

The most expensive state to buy beer? Alaska, where a case costs $31.21 on average, more than double the cost of a case in Illinois.

Wyoming, Hawaii, Montana and Tennessee were the next most expensive states to buy beer, with cases in those states ranging from $22-27 on average.

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