Bronzeville high school reopened after bomb threat, evacuation

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Chicago Military Academy, 3519 S. Giles Ave. | Google Maps

Students were let back into a South Side Bronzeville neighborhood high school after a bomb threat prompted an evacuation Thursday morning.

Chicago Military Academy, 3519 S. Giles Ave., “received a call that resembled a potential threat against the school” Thursday morning, according to a statement from Chicago Public Schools.

The call, which police described as a bomb threat, was received shortly before 9 a.m., according to Chicago police.

Officers responded to assess the credibility of the threat and an evacuation of the school was ordered at 9:26 a.m., police said.

Students and faculty were relocated to Wells Elementary School, 249 E. 37th St., according to CPS.

Authorities searched the school but did not find any evidence of a threat, police said.

School officials said no bomb was found and “the threat was deemed not credible.”

The all-clear was given by about 10:30 a.m. and students were allowed back into the school, according to police.

Some streets were closed and CTA buses were rerouted in the area while authorities investigated, but the reroutes ended by 11 a.m., according to the transit agency.

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