Man dies after being dragged by Red Line train at Roosevelt

His foot got stuck and he was dragged “a few hundred feet” when the train started moving, police said. He was pronounced dead at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

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A man was stabbed on a Red Line train July 1, 2020, near the North/Clybourn station.

CTA Red Line trains were rerouted Feb. 29, 2020, for a “medical emergency on the tracks” at the Roosevelt station.

Sun-Times file photo

A man died Saturday after getting caught between cars and dragged by a Red Line train at the Roosevelt station in the South Loop, prompting a nearly five-hour service disruption.

The 41-year-old man was walking on the platform about 10:40 p.m. at the station, 1167 S. State St., when he fell between train cars, Chicago police said. His foot got stuck and he was dragged “a few hundred feet” when the train started moving.

He suffered lacerations and blunt force trauma and was taken to Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, Chicago fire officials and police said.

He was identified by the Cook County medical examiner’s office as Phillip Walton-El. An autopsy conducted Sunday confirmed he died of his injuries, and his death was ruled an accident.

Red Line trains were rerouted to elevated tracks between the Fullerton and Cermak-Chinatown stations for several hours, according to CTA service alerts. Normal subway service resumed by 3:22 a.m. Sunday.

Area Central detectives are conducting a death investigation.

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