Boy, 13, cut during fight near Gurnee Mills mall

All the children involved in the fight knew each other, and one boy apparently hit the 13-year-old in the head with a small knife, police said.

SHARE Boy, 13, cut during fight near Gurnee Mills mall
A 13-year-old boy was injured in a fight Feb. 29, 2020, near Gurnee Mills mall in the 6100 block of Grand Avenue in Gurnee.

A 13-year-old boy was injured in a fight Feb. 29, 2020, near Gurnee Mills mall in the 6100 block of Grand Avenue in Gurnee.

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A 13-year-old boy was cut with a knife during a fight Saturday near Gurnee Mills mall in north suburban Gurnee.

Authorities were called about 8:45 p.m. for reports of a fight involving multiple minors in a parking lot in the 6100 block of Grand Avenue, according to a statement from Gurnee police. They arrived to find eight children who were involved in the fight, including a 13-year-old boy bleeding from the head.

Investigators learned all the children involved knew each other, and one boy apparently hit the 13-year-old in the head with a small knife, police said. The boy with the knife ran away before police arrived.

Gurnee Fire Department paramedics responded to provide medical treatment, but no one was taken to a hospital, police said.

Officers have identified the boy who ran away and are trying to locate him, police said.

Anyone with information is asked to call police at 847-599-7000 or submit an anonymous tip to Lake County Crime Stoppers at 847-662-2222.

Read more on crime, and track the city’s homicides.

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