Chicago Park District to resume in-person programming

Sports, cultural and nature programs will resume in person starting Monday, the park district said in a statement.

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The Chicago Park District Wednesday announced plans to begin in-person winter programming at parks across the city next week.

Sports, cultural and nature programs will resume in person starting Monday, the park district said in a statement.

The offerings will be limited and socially distanced, and masks will be mandatory, the park district said. In-person participants must register in advance to adhere to capacity limits.

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In-person programs were initially scheduled to begin Jan. 4, but suspended when the state implemented Tier 3 coronavirus mitigation measures.

“The Chicago Park District is committed to protecting our patrons and workforce by following the guidelines put in place by the State’s public health officials,” said General Superintendent and CEO Michael Kelly. “While limited, Winter programs will allow residents to enjoy in-person opportunities in a safe, socially distanced setting”

The park district said they will continue to offer “a vast selection of virtual programs and experiences to keep families active and engaged.”

Visit the Chicago Park District’s website for a full list of in-person and virtual activities.

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