First snowfall of season expected to hit Chicago Friday morning

The snow could hit as early as mid-morning and continue in spurts throughout the day, forecasters say.

SHARE First snowfall of season expected to hit Chicago Friday morning
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There’s a chance of snow Friday afternoon, forecasters say.

Sun-Times file photo

The first snowfall of the season is expected to hit the Chicago area Friday and drop as much as one inch of snow.

The snow could fall as early as mid-morning and continue in spurts throughout the day, according to the National Weather Service. The heaviest bursts are expected in the afternoon.

“It’s not going to be your typical snow system,” National Weather Service meteorologist Casey Sullivan said. The snow is expected to move in bands, with some areas receiving more snowfall than others, he said.

Between a half-inch and inch of snow could fall by the end of the day. But most of that snow will likely melt since roads will stay above freezing.

The largest threat is reduced visibility. “It may be sudden: You’re driving along and then it hits,” Sullivan said.

Mid-November is about average for the first snow of the season, he said.

The average first trace snowfall is Halloween, while the first measurable snowfall happens on average on Nov. 18, according to weather service records. Chicago usually gets its first snowfall of an inch or more on Dec. 7.

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