Former Bartlett chemistry teacher guilty of pouring liquid nitrogen on student

The former teacher, now 66, allegedly poured the liquid on a student’s chest and groin area while performing a demonstration for class.

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Bartlett High School

Bartlett High School

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A former Bartlett High School chemistry teacher was found guilty Tuesday of charges alleging he injured a student during a science demonstration.

Garry Brodersen poured liquid nitrogen on a student’s chest and groin area while performing a demonstration for class on May 15, 2018, according to a statement from the DuPage County state’s attorney’s office.

The chemical caused burn injuries to the student’s groin and a finger, prosecutors said.

Brodersen, 66, of Carpentersville, was released on bond a $15,000 during the trial.

A jury deliberated for four hours after a two-day trial before finding Brodersen guilty of a count each of reckless conduct and endangering the health or life of a child.

“Mr. Brodersen displayed extremely poor judgement when he doused a student with a dangerous chemical during a science demonstration,” State’s Attorney Robert Berlin said in the statement.

Brodersen was expected in court again March 18 for post-trial motions or sentencing.

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